Tag Archives: Savannah

Nov.2… The lovely Davenport home

Savannah has some beautiful old homes, hubby and I stopped to visit one. Bless his heart he was rather bored through the tour,while I was totally delighted.

Mr. Davenport was a builder from the north,but he moved to Ga for he believed that he had more of a chance to build a business in a growing city. He put a lot of hard work and money into his house so that when the wealthy came to his place they would be impressed. Mr. Davenport did well with his business,until his untimely death at 44,due to yellow fever. His wife a resourceful lady,took on a boarder to bring in an income for her and the seven children,(6 boys and one girl). That was the town gossip ,of course for she was a widow,and the boarder a man.

Now the tour…

Floor vinyl in entry way..

The entry, then to the left was the office,and to the right,ballroom and parlor.

The fireplace in the office was impressive , also the floor boards were the full length of the room except one place where he joined the boards.

The parlor

Chairs were pushed back to the sides of the room when it was to be the ballroom. The wallpaper was hand painted. It was so cheerful,and elegant.

The ceiling motif

At the end of the parlor was Mrs. Davenport’s sitting room that would open up to the ballroom if more room was needed.

A cute cradle was in her room..

This was her sewing table,the glass piece with the doll was used as a model,when she went north she would put a model dress on the doll then come home to make herself one like it. The belt like piece is what she would put her needles, thread, and scissors in to roll up to put in her packet when she went visiting to sew with other ladies.

Then up the beautiful stairs…

When coming up the stairs to right the boarders room still under reconstruction,to the left was the little girls room,and she had a feather bed with netting. There was also a very cute tea set.

From the little girls room right into the parents room where a lot of family time was spent on winter evenings. As you walked through the door to your left was the potty. Must say it was a creative one.😀

It would hold a bowl in the bottom for removal for dumping.

Their feather bed,and baby cradle, and the the sitting chair

In her wardrobe,she had only four dresses… imagine that….

then into the boys room . You walked crossed a little hall to enter their room. All the boys slept in this room when Mrs. Davenport had to take on a boarder. There were no feather beds as they were to be boys growing into men. They slept on a canvas with a straw or Spanish moss mattress

And the pot under the bed.🙊 their tub that was used every Saturday night

No stuff chairs here..

Then down the stairs and out the back door to the garden only where the fountain is today was garden and pens for pigs,horse and chickens. There was also an outhouse included but no longer there. The kitchen area and slave rooms were still under construction. She had four slaves that helped her with the household chores,I believe they were all ladies.

we walked along the river front early in the morning other wise you have a hard time seeing because of all the people.

Like here,but there are cute things to notice with people too.

One day doesn’t give you much time to enjoy a beautiful place,but we made the most of it. Hubby did too as he enjoyed the food.

Deb

Sept.3…. Noble Jones

Just a little Peek into some history of Savannah ,Ga. The Wormsloe Plantation is a lovely place to visit ,Spring and fall are my picks when visiting because it can be very warm in summer.

A breathtaking avenue sheltered by live oaks and Spanish moss leads to the tabby ruins of Wormsloe, the colonial estate of Noble Jones (1702–1775). Jones was a humble carpenter who arrived in Georgia in 1733 with James Oglethorpe and the first group of settlers from England. Wormsloe’s tabby ruin is the oldest standing structure in Savannah.

Surviving hunger, plague and warfare in the rugged environment of Georgia, Jones went on to serve the colony as a doctor, constable, Indian agent, Royal Councilor and surveyor, laying out the towns of Augusta and New Ebenezer. He also commanded a company of marines charged with defending the Georgia coast from the Spanish. Jones died at the beginning of the American Revolution, but his descendants sustained Wormsloe until the state of Georgia acquired most of the plantation in 1973. ( note.. taken from their website)

Some of his tools on display

Blacksmith’s building

The chinking was made with clay and oysters shell

The burial place of Noble Jones and family

Part of the remaining fort wall

After lots of walking ,there’s nothing that is more refreshing then some ocean water and sand to the feet.

And a sketch.. a hut on the plantation….

Have a lovely week ,friends!